An Article on Blogging as Therapy

Okay, so very rarely do I post a blog two days in a row, but I felt that this one is worth sharing. I think its important to understand that writing (creatively, blogging, etc.) can be used for a lot of different things.

I actually ran across this article sometime immediately after it was published, and actually did a review on it for a childhood education class. I lost track of it, mainly since I hadn’t started this blog yet. I ran across it last night while I was working on article reviews for a current psych class. The article originally appeared in Monitor on Psychology, which is released by the APA, and the link goes to the article on the APA’s website. (the link to the article is at the bottom of the post)

I’ve personally always loved the idea of using writing in conjunction with more “traditional” therapy. In fact, it’s one of my goals in working towards my higher level degrees. I think there’s so much that can be done with writing therapy, and there’s a growing body of research that supports that idea. As the article says, psychologists have been encouraging the use of journals and writing for years.

And so blogging just seems to be the natural extension of that.

How many of us are online at least once a day? And how easy do sites like wordpress (and various other, not so great) sites make it easy to maintain, not just one, but blogs on as many subjects as you like? For me, it just seems to make sense. Yes, i know that there are hateful people on the internet, but there are also so many kind people who want to encourage others, whether it’s about writing, crafting, mental health, education, whatever.

As far as blogging about mental health, I think the article does a good job in pointing out that one of the biggest benefits to such a blog is the sense of community it can create. It can create that feeling of ‘No, I’m NOT alone in this,’ and that alone is so critical for anyone facing something challenging, whether it’s mentally, physically, or emotionally.

And like I said, I know that there are hateful people on the internet, and the author of the article knows that, too. Comments can be hurtful, but most, if not all, sites allow you the option to screen comments before they’re posted. You can also turn off anonymous comments, which will often cut down on a lot of the hate and troll like behaviour.

And at the end of the day, if there’s one negative comment compared to ten or twenty positive, supportive ones, well, maybe that’s an acceptable trade off. One person being an arrogant jackass isn’t the end of the world, though I realize that the comment can still sting, nonetheless, and I’m not dismissing that. ‘Sticks and stones my break your bones, but words can sometimes kill you,’ after all.

But there’s always the option of turning off the comments, if you’re truly concerned they might be an issue. The research points out that just putting the words out there on the blog is still beneficial.

http://apa.org/monitor/2014/06/blogging.aspx

Oh, and the quote comes from The Lucifer Effect, by Dr. Phillip Zimbardo, the experimenter behind the Stanford Prison Experiment.I encourage you to google it (the experiment itself) if you’re not familiar with it. Just don’t use google images.

Cheers!

Mayuuya